| Home | Articles | Contact Us | Blog | Archive |
 
                                     
               


Dog Training Control Tools

Dog Training - Pros and Cons of Control Tools

Sometimes the distinction between dog training and dog control is easily lost. Using commands and hand gestures, with leashes or treats, to solicit desired behavior is appropriate dog training. Using choke or 'no-bark' collars, electronic fences and similar devices is more for control of a dog.

Control isn't necessarily a bad thing. Dogs naturally have and seek a social hierarchy in which one is the alpha (leader) and in any human-dog pair the human has to take that role. The alternative is property destruction, unsafe conditions for dogs and humans, human frustration and a maladjusted dog.

Choke collars were invented to assist in gaining control. Dogs, like humans, are individuals. Some are naturally more assertive or slower to learn. For ones that don't respond to a normal leather or nylon collar, a metal choke collar can provide extra discouragement from pulling and leaping.

The potential downside is that, used improperly - all too easy to do - they can be counter-productive and even dangerous. Choke collars fit only one way and when fitted should allow from one to three fingers gap between the neck and the collar. Three for larger dogs, one for smaller. Generally a collar two inches longer than the neck circumference will do.

Used improperly, though, choke collars can pinch the skin - producing hot spots that scratching will make worse. They can also accidentally compress the trachea. An instantaneous pull-and-release isn't harmful, though by design produces discomfort, but for dogs that tend to pull against the leash this movement is difficult to do. Generally not recommended, especially for smaller dogs.

Prong collars are less dangerous than they appear, but - in this trainer's view - have almost no positive characteristics. The only good aspect of the design is their limited diameter - they can only close down so far. However, an animal with such a strong tendency to pull that prongs look attractive needs more than a quick fix consisting of choking and poking. That animal needs committed attention and behavior modification training.

Halter collars, which wrap around the neck and the muzzle, but don't prevent panting or impair drinking can give extra control. The downside is, since they don't restrict biting or grasping, half their potential value is gone. An ordinary leash and collar, or even a chest halter might be preferable.

'No-bark' collars can sometimes help with those dogs that persist in barking long after the initial impetus is gone. Barking is a natural response to potential threats and is also used to attract attention when one becomes separated from the pack. But, for reasons not well understood, some dogs continue barking for long periods or at the slightest provocation.

Electronic collars that discourage barking come in two types: noise and shock. Noise collars produce a short, unpleasant sound that distracts and tends to discourage continued barking.

Shock collars generate a short but painful electric shock that can be repeated and lengthy during prolonged or persistent barking. Objective tests of their effectiveness show varied results, though. As with prong collars, any dog needing one would benefit more from careful, professional help.

Sometimes quick fixes are tempting and useful... until they become substitutes for more beneficial (both to trainer and dog) long-term training. Taking the time to learn to get your dog's attention and compliance without excessive reliance on dog training and control devices is preferred. The results are saner trainers and happier dogs.



Small Dog Breed Articles

Large Dog Breed Articles

Pitbull Articles

Dalmation Articles

Chihuahua Articles

Dog Behavioral Problems

Dog Nutrition

Dog Training

Dog Supplies and Training Aids

Dog Shows and Dog Handling

Subscribe
to our newsletter.
It's Free!


Related Links:


 Dog Training A Dog\ s Nature
 Dog Training Control Tools
 Dog Training Crate Training Pros and Cons
 Dog Training Dealing With Jumping
 Dog Training Diet
 Dog Training Dog Psychology
 Dog Training Electronic Fences
 Dog Training Finding a Trainer
 Dog Training Housebreaking Your Puppy
 Dog Training How To Stop Chewing
 Dog Training No You Come
 Dog Training No You Down
 Dog Training No You Sit
 Dog Training No You Stay
 Dog Training Non Neutered Dogs
 Dog Training Purebred Training
 Dog Training Socializing Your Dog
 Dog Training Specialized Training and Tests
 Dog Training Specialized Training Assistance Dogs
 Dog Training Specialized Training Service Dogs
 Dog Training Styles Part I
 Dog Training Styles Part II
 Dog Training The Basics
 Dog Training Tips for Large and Small Dogs
 Dog Training Tips for Selecting Game Dogs
 Dog Training Training Devices
 Dog Training Your Dog Around Horses
 Dog Tricks Training
 Home Dog Training
 How to Crate Train Your Dog
 Obedience Training
 Training Assertive Dogs
 Training Older Dogs
 Training Passive Dogs
 Training Rescued Dogs
 Training Show Dogs
 Training the Dog Trainer
 Training Your Dog Not To Bite




                        
                             
Google
Copyright 2005 dog-articles.net All Rights Reserved.